DOJ Filed Lawsuit to Stop Texas from Criminalizing Abortion Procedures

Last week, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced that the DOJ filed a lawsuit against Texas’ new abortion law which bans the procedure after six weeks of pregnancy. AG Garland added that the law was clearly unconstitutional and beneath a precedent Supreme Court ruling.

The legal action was filed after the Supreme Court denied the request of Texas-based abortion service providers’to block the law. The DOJ lawsuit named Texas as the defendant, whilst seeking to have the state’s anti-abortion law be declared void, null, and invalid. Specifically, the lawsuit is also petitioning for a ruling that prohibits the state and other private parties from enforcing the provisions of Texas Senate Bill 8.

When is Abortion Legal in the U.S.?

The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitutions protects the right of pregnant women to choose abortion as an option and the right to privacy, for as long as the procedure is not in violation of  other laws. Yet the  new law under SB 8 violates the aforementioned federal law by making it a criminal act to assist a pregnant woman who seeks or needs to abort her pregnancy within the bounds of what is recognized as legal. .

The “heartbeat” law bans abortion once there is a heartbeat detected from the fetus, which usually happens during the 6th week of pregnancy when a woman is still unaware of her pregnancy.

5 Text Messaging Laws Every Business Must Know

Although many consumers appreciate the chance to receive information via SMS, an unregulated texting landscape can cause a barrage of unwanted messages, overwhelming potential customers and preventing them from having the ability to tell apart between communications they require to receive and people that are spam.

Text Messaging for Business

 

To avoid this problem and improve the patron experience, furthermore because of the integrity of contact information and private data, many countries, like the US, the UK, Australia, and EU Members, have distinct laws on covering text message marketing when texting customers.

All of the subsequent text messaging laws include identical general principles – like prior consent and therefore the ability to unsubscribe – but there are subtle differences between them and understanding these can facilitate your to focus on your SMS marketing strategy accordingly for various parts of the globe.

1. United States: the Telephone Consumer Protection Act

In the US, the three organizations that pander to text regulations are the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association (CTIA), the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and also the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA).

The FCC could be a fully-fledged bureau with legislative powers that have enacted multiple laws While the CTIA and MMA are organizations that encourage best practices for text message marketing. This includes the Telephone Consumer Protection Act and CAN-SPAM, to manage SMS marketing.

According to the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), which has been the FCC’s leading regulation in electronic communications since 1991, businesses and organizations must obtain written consent from individuals before sending them any text messages including sending overseas text messages or 해외문자발송 in Hangul. Whether or not a business has an individual’s sign or already has an “established business relationship.” written consent remains required.

To ensure full TCPA compliance, the buyer must have received “clear and conspicuous disclosure” of the text messages they’re going to receive from the organization and must comply with receive these messages to their specific number.

Texts must include both the sender’s identity and opt-out instructions to ensure full transparency. Businesses must provide a method for consumers to opt out by replying to the text message. Additionally, texts can only be sent between 8 am and 9 pm to attenuate inconvenience to the buyer.

Financial damages starting from $500 to $1500 per text message sent to every individual who failed to provide consent is just one of the consequences of noncompliance. It’s worth noting that nonprofit organizations, which are tax-exempted, are exempt from TCPA’s opt-in and “do-not-call” requirements.

2. United States: CAN-SPAM ACT

Complementing the provisions laid enter TCPA, the CAN-SPAM Act forbids businesses to send commercial email messages to a transportable. CAN-SPAM defines commercial messages as promotions for a product or service or advertisements.

When sending a billboard email to a mobile device, CAN-SPAM requires that the e-mail is well identifiable as an advert, that recipients can easily unsubscribe or opt-out from receiving further messages which the sender includes a return email address and zip code.

 

ALSO READ: 4 Ways MS Office Can Be Beneficial to Lawyers

 

3. Australia: Spam Act

Australia’s Spam Act makes it illegal to send “unsolicited commercial electronic messages,” including email marketing and texting, which was recently updated in 2016. Therefore, it’s required that companies must first receive explicit consent from the recipient.

It’ll suffice if the recipient has an existing relationship together with your business, unlike TCPA within the US, under Australia’s Spam Act. However, like TCPA and CAN-SPAM, any text message marketing under the Spam Act must also identify your business at the outset and supply a choice to unsubscribe from future text messages.

Another notable difference is that if you provide an inventory of contacts who have agreed to receive messages from third parties, and get them from another organization, you’ll use the list in your own marketing communications.

4. United Kingdom: Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations

In the UK, the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR), released by the knowledge Commissioner’s Office (ICO), governs text marketing laws supported by the information Protection Act.

In the interest of transparency and consumer protection, businesses that use consumers’ personal data must inform them how their data is getting used. Like the previous acts, SMS marketing is prohibited without prior consent.

Previous customers may have a “soft opt-in” if they provided their contact information and already engaged in an exceedingly sale or negotiation with the business, just like in Australia. The choice to unsubscribe from messages is additionally required for SMS compliance.

5. EU: General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

The new kid on the block, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will acquire effect on 25 May 2018.

The purpose of this law, which applies to any or all countries looking to try and do business with the EU and/or to use EU citizens’ personal data, is to boost data security, specifically associated with the storing and transport of information, enabling citizens to opt-in to sharing their data and improving the responses to data breaches.

The new GDPR regulations apply not only to commercial text messaging, but also to data security normally, and can likely affect all aspects of your organization.

With fewer than sixty days remaining before the GDPR deadline, now’s the time to make sure that your organization complies with the new requirements.

Conclusion

Compliance with all local regulations is imperative so as to make trust with consumers and also the relevant supervisory authorities wherever and whenever your organization decides to use text message marketing. By adhering to the principles of consent, opt-out, and private data security, you’ll establish yourself as an entity that prioritizes customers’ choice and protection additionally to providing excellent products and services.